Helpful Information

Contact Me !!!!!

Randy Marble

marblesmotors@gmail.com

214.686.0044

 

Bob’s General Services - Seat covers and restoration

www.bgsmc.yahoo.com

Bob specializes in seat restoration for almost all bikes.  He is an incredible talent at restoring any damaged seat pans.  I have personally used him for several seats.

Bob's General Service
P.O. Box 103
Baxter, Iowa 50028
or
Bob's General Service
6805 Main Street
Ira, Iowa 50127
Phone 515-490-3804

PAINT

Frame Paint

A recent breakthrough has allowed me to offer the silver paint that Honda used for many years directly to you in the form of a spray can and then the clear coat that goes on top.  This is true automotive grade Deltron PPG paint and you can get fantastic results with it.  I offer this paint as a kit.  Click here for more information.

Engine Cover Paint - Clutch / Stator / Sprocket

I typically have all my engines disassembled, ultrasonically cleaned and surfaces restored when doing a restoration.  As a part of the rebuild, the interior engine cases are left natural aluminum, but the bolt on covers need a special low metallic silver high heat paint.  Whether you are rebuilding an engine or not, the engine deserves to have a good detailing and although you can't get it perfect without a complete disassembly, you can certainly improve the looks with a thorough cleaning and some paint on those places where boots scuff and gasoline tarnishes.   Click here for more information.

Honda XL250 / XL350 - Engine Cover Paint - Greenish Gray

I have formulated the color for the XL250/XL350 Engine side cases and have it packaged in a spray can.  I offer this paint as a kit.  Click here for more information.

Honda MT Engine Paint

I have formulated the color for the MT Honda engines.  I offer this paint as a kit.  Click here for more information.

FUEL TANK CLEANING / COATING

Our Painting Services

214-686-0044

We offer the services of cleaning and professionally lining your tank as a part of a complete paint job.  We do not do these services unless they are attached to a complete job.  Please see Elizabeth Radiator below.

Elizabeth Radiator

412-384-5310

This is the real deal for cleaning out your old tank.  If you have ever tried the "Kreem" route, you will know how difficult, messy and actually.... how it will lift off if the surface isn't perfectly etched.  Elizabeth Radiator offers an alternative where the tank is blasted and then coated with "Red Coat".  This is essentially the same stuff used on the inside of radiators.  It isn't thick and nasty like Kreem, and it stay's put. 

 DECALS

I carry a lot of decals for the Japanese bikes as well as others. 

 Click here for more information.

 PARTS

Honda Parts

Call or e-mail me for your needs.  I can beat your local dealer pricing.

Dr B. Recycle Sales

Recycle@airmail.net

A source for vintage Japanese motorcycle parts.

Honda Keys

www.hondakeys.com

Here is where you can get additional keys for your Honda.  Just send Mark the key number from the lock or your key and he will fix you right up.

Z1 Enterprises

www.z1enterprises.com

Specializing in restoration and replacement parts for the Kawasaki 900 Z1’s.  Jeff Saunders is an incredible resource and very helpful.

RE-MX

www.re-mx.com

Take a look at Dan's web page for some hard to find SL70 items.

Headlight Ear Bolts, Reflectors, Side Covers, Side Cover Grommets, Decals, Carb to Airbox Rubber, Seat Covers, Foot Pegs etc.

ENGINES

Engine Rebuilder

Send me your engine and it will come back restored, rebuilt and ready to install.

TIPS

Front Fork Disassembly

Use an axle?

Here is a little trick to take the front forks apart so that you can polish the lowers and replace the oil seals.   Once you have the fork off the bike, remove the dust seal.  Next, use snap ring pliars to remove the retaining ring.  Next comes the flat washer that is on top of the oil seal.  Once removed, put the front axle back through the lower hole.  Put the assembly down on the concrete floor and put a foot on either side of the axle and begin pushing down and pulling back up against the stop.  Usually after a few pops, the top tube and spring will come sailing out to you.  Don't hit your self in the nose.

Here is a picture of a tool that I made that fits over the mounting hole in the top of the upper shock tube.  I put this on using the top bolt and use it to push and pull the tube until the old seal breaks loose.

Front Fork Oil Seals

PVC is your friend

After you have polished your fork lowers and are ready to reassemble, place the oil seal on the upper tube and insert it into the lower.  Put the flat washer on top of the oil seal.  Now for the trick.  Go to your local hardware store and get some PVC that is larger inside diameter than the upper tube, and as near the size of the oil seal as possible.  I usually try to get Schedule 40 PVC as it is stronger.  I also buy a 'cap' for the PVC as this will make this inexpensive tool last longer.  Place the PVC over the tube and let it rest on the flat washer on top of the oil seal.  I use a rubber or plastic faced mallet to hit the PVC which drives the oil seal down into the lower tube.  You will know you've hit bottom when you can see the groove for the snap ring.

 

Kick Stand Springs

Boooiiiiinnnnggg

Frustrated with trying to take your kick stand spring on and off?   Simple fix:  Go to the parts store and buy a brake spring tool for a drum break car.  The end that takes off the little clips on the drum brakes works perfectly for taking the spring off.  The other end......which is designed to put springs on works perfectly for the installation.

Wheel Disassembly / Spoke Removal

Unless you are going to try to polish each old spoke by hand to restore the finish (I don't have that much patience), use a set of bolt cutters to bust the old ones in half.  I usually go right where the two spokes cross and get two-for-one results.  It is best to take pictures of your assembled wheels prior to this as the installation of spokes is somewhat like a Rubic's cube if you don't have a pattern.

Electrical Tips

Feeding Wiring Through Small Places

On the Honda SL's there are a couple of places where wiring must be snaked through a small area.  Examples:  The taillight wiring on an SL70, and the on/off switch thru the handlebars.  I  use two things to help.

1)  Use an old piece of wire such as one strand of romex.  This will easily slide through the handlebars.  Once through, use electrical tape to affix it to the multiple wires and then pull through.

2)  Spray a liberal amount of lithium grease through the holes before starting to snake the wires through.

On the taillight wires on SL70's, just do them one at a time and use some of the lithium grease.  It is easier than it looks.  One side of the enclosure gets two wires and the other gets one.

Ignition Switches on SL70's

The SL70 K0 and K1 have completely different wiring harnesses and key switches and they will not interchange.  You'll end up blowing the fuse everytime if you use a K1 switch with a K0 harness etc.  Few people know this and when looking at a used or new switch........especially on ebay, make sure you are getting the right one.  Here's how to tell:   Pull back the large rubber cover and look at the lolor of the wires.  If there is a blue wire, it is for a K0.  If there is a red wire with a white stripe, it is for a K1.  I now have replacement SL70 K0 switches available Here.

 

Marblesmotors ©2004